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The Recruiter Assistance Program (RAP program) allows recent active duty tech school graduates, officer training school graduates, and other airmen to return to their hometown for up to 12 days while assisting their Air Force Recruiter. These 12 days count as non-chargeable leave days while using this program.

In the RAP program, you will provide personal testimonials for new recruits, possibly assist with school visits, and provide general assistance to your recruiter in the recruiting office. Expect to assist with the delayed entry program commander’s calls and PT sessions as well.

The Air Force Recruiter Assistance Program isn’t limited to newly graduated airmen though. Airmen can utilize the recruiter assistance program anytime, even after arriving at your first duty station.

Doing The Air Force Recruiter Assistance Program

The Air Force Recruiter Assistance Program is a great program to use. It gives you the chance to go back home after tech school and see family and friends. It feels good to go back home and show everyone the new you.

12 paid non-chargeable leave days is a plus too. Yes, you will have to work but it’s far less than you’ve had to in basic training and after.

Typically, the hours worked all depend on what the recruiter has in store for that week. Some days you could work a full day, and others you could be told not to go into the recruiting office. Military pay is salary based, so you’d still get paid when your recruiter tells you not to go to work. A perk of the program.

When I did the RAP program, I came back home after tech school and only had to work about 5 days. Some of those days were only half days too. Having a handful of those 12 non-chargeable leave days to spend outside of your Air Force uniform with family is worth doing the program.

Participation in the Recruiter Assistance Program is completely voluntary. You can’t be “voluntold” to do so, although most new airmen happily volunteer and apply for the program.

Plus, unlike many other programs, there is no limit to the amount of Air Force Rap program participants performing duties at one location. Multiple newly graduated airmen could be at the same location simultaneously.

Recruiter Assistance Program – Important Things To Know

You will get paid your normal military pay while participating in the Recruiter Assistance Program. However, anything beyond that isn’t going to be granted. Expect to pay for your own means of travel to your first duty station or port call location. No food and housing per diem or travel expenses is included. It’s all out of your pocket, so be prepared to save up some travel money in tech school or officer training school.

Travel expenses and per diem are also not granted for career airmen doing the RAP program.

Doing the Recruiter Assistance Program after Air Force Tech School or Officer Training School, you are required to contact your Air Force Recruiter when you arrive home. They’ll give you further instructions on when to arrive at the recruiter’s office. If you arrive on a weekend, sometimes the Air Force recruiter won’t have you come in until Monday.

Another important thing to know about the Recruiter Assistance Program, if you don’t perform assigned duties while doing the program, you could have your non-chargeable leave days revoked. This would make them turn into charged leave, which means the leave days you have accumulated will be dipped into.

The most important thing to know is you must submit your application to the program 4 weeks prior to Tech School graduation, or Officer Training School graduation.

How To Apply For The RAP Program After Tech School

When you’re in tech school, you’ll be informed about the program and given the option to fill out the application. Your schoolhouse instructor, or MTL, will give you the rundown of how it all works. Lucky for you, I’ll do it for you here ahead of time.

First, you’ll fill out your application. If you need any help doing so, just ask your MTL or schoolhouse instructor, and they’ll help guide you through the process.

Then, you’ll submit your recruiter assistance program application to your MTL. Remember, be sure to submit it no later than 4 weeks before graduation. Your MTL at tech school will send it up the chain for recommendation and approval.

The chain looks something like this: your application is sent to your training squadron commander, training group commander, or a designated individual. Next, if recommended, the application gets forwarded to a recruiting squadron for the squadron commander and your recruiter to approve or deny.

After you submit the application, the process is fairly simple and hands-off on your part. However, if your tech school graduation dates change, you need to notify your Air Force Recruiter and Recruiting Squadron as soon as possible. Your RAP after tech school could be affected if you don’t.

Here is the recruiter assistance program application: AFRS Form 1327

Helpful information to fill out your RAP application:

http://www.recruiting.af.mil/AboutUs/GroupsSquadrons.aspx

Here you can find your nearest recruiter, recruiting squadron, and RAP monitor.

How Long Does It Take To Get Rap Approved?

The application process needs to start four weeks before your tech school graduation or officer training school graduation. The same is true for airmen using the program who are already stationed at their first duty station.

Remember: The RAP program application has to be submitted 4 weeks before the anticipated graduation or leave date.

After the application submission, the Air Force recruiter assistance program takes 7 working days to get approved or denied.

Whether you’re a new airman trying to get approved fresh out of tech school, or a seasoned airman, the application will take 7 working days to get approved. Seniority has no pull here.

How Many Times Can Apply For Rap Duty?

Not many airmen actually use the RAP program after their initial use out of tech school or officers training school. Possibly, that’s simply because many don’t realize they can still use the program again afterwards.

There is no a limit on the number of times you can do rap duty. That doesn’t mean you can do them back-to-back though.

You don’t wanna be known as Tony Hawk where you work, skating off instead of working. That’s what we called one guy in our fuels shop.

Usually, you can expect to be allowed to do the Recruiter Assistance Program once a year. Misusing the program to avoid your Air Force job responsibilities will ultimately get your application rejected.

How To Apply For The Recruiter Assistance Program As A Career Airman

Air Force members who want to do the RAP program later in their Air Force career must do these steps:

  1. Use the Air Force recruiter locator to find nearest recruiter’s office near your leave location.
  2. Get prior approval from your unit commander for non-chargeable leave days.
  3. Fill out the AFRS IMT 1327 form.
  4. Email your application to the Air Force recruiting RAP monitors, 4 weeks prior to desired leave days.

Here are easy to find RAP monitor email addresses and recruiting squadron locations so you can submit your application to the right place.

Remember: you will be notified within 7 work days of approval or denial.

Recruiters and the approving chain will normally recommend approval for your application. However, one common reason for denial is the Air Force Recruiter is unavailable when you’d like to be in the area. Another possible reason is the commute to the recruiting office is too far from your hometown.

To Wrap It Up

The Recruiter Assistance Program is something every airman should do. Whether you’re a new airman or have been in the military for years, it’s a great opportunity. The Air Force offers an amazing number of leave days each year, so why not use the program for some extra days at home.

What would you do at home if you used the program?

Corey Porter

Corey Porter

Air Force Veteran

Corey is an Air Force veteran and the lead writer at Basic to Blues. He refueled fighter jets as a young airman and deployed twice to the Middle East. Now Corey can be found hiking in the Pacific Northwest.

Who the hell… POL!

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